Category Archives: News

Scholarships: Don’t Leave Them A-loan!

Kate Ariano ‘18
EE Co-Managing Editor

With college on the horizon for hundreds of seniors, the presentation was a way for parents to be introduced to the application process for financial aid.

Student loans. Perhaps one of the most daunting factors to consider about college. For many students, tens of thousands of dollars in debt awaits them post-graduation. But this does not have to be the case. Between scholarships and federal financial aid, students have several opportunities to get ‘free money’ for college.

During the College Financial Aid Night presentation, hosted by Brianna Bono of the Sacred Heart University financial aid office, parents learned that the first step to getting college money is the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Bono explained that no matter whether you believe you will get money out of the FAFSA or not, you should apply. Not only is it a free application, but many different factors go into determining how much is awarded, so it’s worth it to try and see what you can get.

THSGEMB Marches in Style

Jessica Parillo ‘18
EE Co-Editor in Chief

When the Golden Eagle Marching Band performed at their first competition on September 16, they were almost unrecognizable. Gone were the familiar white jackets and rounded helmets; instead the band rolled out onto the field at Brien McMahon High School in a swarm of black and gold.

The band’s updated look came courtesy of brand new uniforms, which were generously donated by Shirley Bonazzo in memory of her late daughter Nicole Osborne-Bonazzo. Over 120 uniforms were provided to the band for the fall 2018 season.

“I think the new uniforms were a wonderful gift from Mrs. Bonazzo,” says Hunter Kadish, class of 2019. “She is a spectacular lady and the uniforms are absolutely incredible. We are all very appreciative and her daughter’s memory will live on in the new uniforms.”

Much Anticipated Healthcare Reform Will Not Face Senate Vote

Michael Cerulli ‘19
EE Contributor

Manan Manchanda ‘19
EE News Editor

Lindsey Graham and Bill Cassidy

Senate Republicans appear to be short on votes to pass the controversial Graham-Cassidy health care bill. The bill, which would have repealed the Affordable Care Act and offset the cost of healthcare to the state level, will not face a vote on the Senate floor. This comes as John McCain (R-Arizona), Susan Collins (R-Maine), and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) all stated that they would not vote yes on the long-awaited bill. Senate Republicans appear to be short on votes to pass the controversial Graham-Cassidy health care bill. The bill, which would have repealed the Affordable Care Act and offset the cost of healthcare to the state level, will not face a vote on the Senate floor. This comes as John McCain (R-Arizona), Susan Collins (R-Maine), and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) all stated that they would not vote yes on the long-awaited bill.

“I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal,” McCain said.

To Kneel or Not to Kneel: That is the Question

Colin Kaepernick kneels during the national anthem.

Ethan Bachand ‘18
EE Co-Managing Editor

What started with one man on a fateful night in August has transformed into something no one could have ever anticipated. It was on August 14th, when Colin Kaepernick, former quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers,  took a seat on the bench during the national anthem. He did so to protest police brutality and promote racial equality.

What started with one man on a fateful night in August has transformed into something no one could have ever anticipated. It was on August 14th, when Colin Kaepernick, former quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers,  took a seat on the bench during the national anthem. He did so to protest police brutality and promote racial equality. At first, no one noticed- not until three games into the preseason- when a single photo would spark one of the major story lines of the 2016 season.  Fast forward 13 months later, and there is some sort of demonstration that is conducted by a player on each and every NFL team. So how did we get here?

The Show Goes On!

Kate Ariano ‘18
EE Senior Features Editor

Nick Gomez-Colon introduces his composition prior to it’s performance.

The choir without a doubt performed a joyful show for their audience last Tuesday, leaving the crowd in smiles and tears as it was the graduating seniors’ last show of their high school career.

After being postponed from the original May 18 date due to issues with the air conditioning system in the auditorium, the choir concert was nothing short of successful this time around. A couple songs in the program like “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” and “Balleilakka” featured new and exciting choreography from students Colin McLevy and Kavya Ganugapati. The audience commenced into cheers and laughs that rang throughout the auditorium.

Questbridge: An Alternative Road to College

Katie Boback ‘17
EE Sr. Entertainment Editor

Even with college prices consistently on the rise, taking out a daunting pile of loans is not the only way to ease the burden of attending college.

Questbridge is a non-profit organization that attempts to provide low-income, top high school students with an affordable education at the country’s best schools. They provide scholarship opportunities to high school juniors, and for seniors, a program called the college match.

Eagles Fly Away From the Nest

Ethan Bachand ‘18
EE Co-News Editor

Every year, one of the most exciting parts of May is looking back on where seniors were accepted to college and what schools got the most applicants. The Class of 2017 did not leave us bored, as this year’s departing seniors had a combination of tradition, new territory, and continued high degrees of excellence.

Like every year, there was the annual outflux of students to the most popular college in Connecticut: UConn. With the added benefit of having a sports team that almost guarantees a victory every time that they play, the school boasts over 32,000 enrolled students , which provides the big school feeling that is still close to home. Students from Trumbull have always applied and attended UConn, especially Storrs, in great numbers.

President Trump Fires FBI Director James Comey

Manan Manchanda ‘19
EE Co-News Editor

Last week, President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey. Comey had served as FBI Director since September of 2013. For one, the President was not pleased with the way the situation with Hillary Clinton’s compromised emails was handled, being one reason for his firing. This sudden dismissal of Comey from his head FBI position also effectively ended all investigations involving ties with President Trump and whether or not his campaign had involvement with the Russian government or other Russian nationals to change the outcome of the 2016 Presidential election.

In a message to Comey, President Trump stated, “While I greatly appreciate you informing me, on three separate occasions, that I am not under investigation, I nevertheless concur with the judgment of the Department of Justice that you are not able to effectively lead the bureau.” The growing tensions between the investigation revolving around Russia’s interference and President Trump’s assertions about Russia’s noninvolvement clearly heated up into the ultimate action taken by the President last Tuesday.

Woolery Slam Dunks on the Competition

Kate Ariano ‘18
EE Features Editor

Poetry slam MC’s: “Beans” and Danny Hoffman

Have you ever heard a poem about Donald Trump and Alexa, the Amazon device, using their powers to kill the bees and inevitably Beyonce? Or what about how a past love has shaped you into who you are today? Perhaps you heard the one about the bathroom epidemic and mexican food at school being too hot. As a matter of fact, that is the poem that won the entire Poetry Slam for junior Daejah Woolery last Friday night.  

Woolery expresses that “Most performers I’ve talked to will tell you they always either remember every detail of being on stage, or none at all. This year, I remember every action and I’m glad I do. It;s a highlight of my time at THS.”

Committees Debate at Model Congress Spring Conference

Manan Manchanda ‘19
EE Co-News Editor

This week, Model Congress had their second ever school-wide conference. For several hours after school, students debated a wide variety of topics, such as net neutrality, improved rehabilitation in prisons, and mandatory vaccinations for schooling children. Students were organized into two committees: the House Ethics Committee, and the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee.

The conference was a great success, with heated debate on a wide variety of topics, allowing our students to use their critical thinking skills and further develop their abilities to be able to think on their feet.


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