Category Archives: Science

Hope for Pluto

Pluto holds uncertain fortunes: planet or dwarf plantet?

Amaya Mikolic-Berrios ‘21
EE News Editor

Most students currently in school would agree that Pluto is not a planet. This simple idea has been taught since the dwarf planet was demoted from a planet in 2006. Although weak attempts have been made to regain Pluto’s planetary status, none of them were of much gravity. However, on September 13, a University of Central Florida professor proposed a shocking notion that may give Pluto another chance at being a planet.

According UCF professor Philip Metzger, as reported in the Orlando Sentinel, there are hundreds of planets in our solar system. He and several coworkers labored through over two centuries of planetary science reports in an effort to unearth exactly why and when the definition of a planet had been altered.

When the International Astronomical Union voted on its definition of a planet, the criteria came entirely out of the blue. As many students are familiar with, the IAU’s measure of whether a celestial body qualifies as a planet is split into three parts: the body must orbit the sun, have a nearly spherical structure, and be the only celestial body in its orbit. The last point, which was the cause for Pluto’s demotion, is what many scientists since the IAU’s decision have disagreed with.

The Eastern States Exposition: A Big succEss

Lambs chilling at the Big E; photo courtesy of Kathryn Wilkinson

Kathryn Wilkinson ‘21
EE Science and Technology Editor

On Tuesday September 25th, the students studying at Agriscience took their annual trip to the Eastern States Exposition. The Big E, showcasing livestock, horses, poultry, and plenty more, was a great opportunity for agriscience students to enhance their knowledge of their specific subject area.

Over the course of the next year, juniors and seniors enrolled in the UCONN ECE Equine and Animal Science course offered at Agriscience will increase their comprehension of feeding and caring for the animals, understanding their anatomy, physiology, and genetics as well as judging and evaluating them. While at the Big E, these students had the opportunity to talk with individuals that raise and show their animals and learn more about their area of study.

The Orionids and More to Come

Amaya Mikolič-Berrios ‘21
EE Staff Writer

The evening of October 20th featured a spectacular show for everyone who happened to be looking at the night sky. The peak of the Orionid meteor shower, also known simply as the Orionids, sparked star gazers’ interest for more than just its beauty.
According to astronomer Bob Berman from an interview with Doyle Rice of USA Today, these meteors are special because they are actually “fragments of the most famous comet of all time, Halley’s Comet.”

The shower is caused by Earth’s orbit passing through the debris created by Halley’s Comet. This debris is what makes up the “shooting stars” we can see in the night sky. Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office predicts, “Bits of comet dust hitting the atmosphere should give us a couple dozen of meteors per hour.” In comparison to the average, about ten to fifteen meteors per hour, this is a much higher rate.


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