Category Archives: Sports

Women Still Discriminated in Athletics through Unequal Pay

United States women’s national team.

Maggie LoSchiavo ’19
EE Contributor

The interest in women’s athletics has been on the rise for years. However, despite this expansion, there is a large wage gap in men and women’s sports. This wage gap contradicts the message about equality that the media has been portraying while trying to empower young female athletes, as it make them feel less valued than men.

According to Adelphi University’s Master of Science in Sport Management program, “The top female soccer players earn $177,831 less, or only 14.4% of what the men earn. This comes despite America’s women outshining the men on the field.”

These statistics convey that women are not viewed as equal in sports, despite their effort and competitiveness. The women’s soccer team is actually the most successful team in the world, compared to the men who are only ranked 25th. Recently, the women’s team filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission about this issue.

The Tracking Men

Joshua Dubreuil ‘20
EE Staff Writer

Junior Andy Spillane pole vaults over height during indoor track.

Wintertime is coming to an end and more sports are starting up again here at Trumbull High School. Track is a very popular sport at THS and since nobody gets cut from the team, there is no pressure of being the best on the field. It is a great experience for all of the participants.

The team captains for this years boys track team are Chris Lepore, Nigel Hayes, Hank Schober and Zach Iannucci. The coaches are Coach Banks, Coach Sages, Coach Tait, and Coach Gaines.

Junior Adrien Joseph, who has run track for his entire high school career, described his first year of track as, “A great way to meet new friends and try out a new sport.” He also added that,“It really impacted my freshman year in a great way and it was something I will definitely not regret.”

New Season, New Strike Zone

James Dubreuil ‘19
EE Managing Editor

A computer analyzing a professional pitcher’s pitch.

The MLB has been evolving to maintain its popularity among millennials and incorrect calls in the strike-zone could be the root of the next change. This spring training, the league is using a pitch clock to speed up games; however, the MLB also has the opportunity to turn to computerized home plate umpires that will be able to call balls and strikes with more accuracy than human beings, and could save hitters from bad calls made by home plate umpires.

PITCHf/x, created and maintained by Sportvision, is a system that tracks the speeds and trajectories of pitched baseballs. This system, which made its debut in the 2006 MLB playoffs, is installed in every MLB stadium. The data from the system is often used by broadcasters to show a visual representation of the pitch and whether or not a pitch entered the strike-zone. For more than a decade, PITCHf/x technology has shown television viewers of baseball an idea of whether the pitch was a ball or strike, and whether or not the home plate umpire made the correct call.

Trumbull Wins the Fan Showdown Once Again

Francesca Tesei ’12
EE Contributor

Trumbull’s Black Hole

For the third time in the past four years, Trumbull dominates and wins the Ruden Report fan showdown. Every year, all 17 of the fan sections in the FCIAC get a chance to compete against each other in what’s called a fan showdown run by the Ruden Report.

The fan showdown includes two components, a voting poll and a video showing the fan section in action. The voting poll is open for a few days and each section has to promote and spread the word to vote for their student section over the others. The video is composed of different videos of the sports teams and the fan section to prove their school spirit visually. These two parts have different sets of points that can be earned to add to a total point and then a ranking. A few judges chosen by Dave Ruden judge the videos but stay anonymous. The school who wins, has the most amount of points, receives $500 that goes towards their athletic department and of course they also receive bragging rights.

Many people participated in helping the black hole to win the fan showdown this year. This includes Athletic Director Mr. King, the Black Hole leaders who organized and promoted the black hole, and of course the dedicated fans to make up the Black Hole.

Girls Ice Hockey Season Preview

Sophie Leeds ‘19
EE Contributor

Trumbull/St. Joseph Co-op Forward Rachel Zack skates against Wilton.

The Trumbull – St. Joseph’s High School Ice Hockey co-op team has returned to the ice this December. They will play eleven home games this year at the Shelton Rinks and nine games on the road. Despite last season’s outcome, players from the team are confident that with good communication and hard work their season will be unlike past years. Losing just two seniors from last year and gaining some strong freshmen players, this season marks the most amount of girls participating in Trumbull girls ice hockey history.

Some would think to play on a team consisting of both Trumbull and St. Joseph would be problematic given the history and rivalry among the two schools, however, junior defender Annika Haakonsen disagrees. “It’s so much fun… having people from both schools on one team makes the comeradery between us feel more expansive and interesting than if we just played with girls from one school. We all became friends very quickly, and the second we step on the ice, we’re one unified Trumbull team.”
Senior captain, Rachel Zack agrees, and is thankful for the opportunity to have “…met a lot of great people [she] otherwise wouldn’t have met if it wasn’t for being on this team.” Zack is one of three captains this year, her role has been “to pump up the team, help organize practices with the coaches and co-captains and most importantly bring the team together.”

Strong Start to Trumbull Boys Basketball Season

Gregory Kaufmann ’19
EE Contributor

Members of the boys basketball team pictured (from left) Assistant Coach Matthew Landin, Chris Brown, Quentar Taylor, John Fromageot, Timmond Williams, and Head Coach Buddy Bray;

As winter approaches and temperatures drop, the long awaited basketball season returns and the courts start to heat up. After a heartbreaking FCIAC championship loss, the Trumbull High School Eagles are back in black and gold.

After great success – but falling short of their ultimate goal – the team is primed for another great run, and optimistic as well as determined to win that fabled Championship they were so close to last year.

Captain Chris Brown stated “our expectations for this year are to finish first and win a championship.”

Head Coach Buddy Bray similarly advocates, “we have high goals for this year and are returning 7 seniors. We want to play together, stay healthy, play at a high level every night, and make a deep run in the FCIAC playoffs.”

The goals and aspirations for the Eagles are clear, and since their season ended on a sour note last year, they are determined to change the narrative of Trumbull basketball. As Chris Brown explains, the team has been working hard all off-season, playing in fall and summer leagues such as PHD and DTX along with preseason conditioning and lifting to improve their game for the upcoming season.

Coach Bray Reflects on Thirty-Two Seasons

Kelly O’Leary ’19
EE Contributor

Clifford Bray, better known as Buddy Bray, has been at Trumbull High School for a total of 36 years between being a student and physical education teacher, but most importantly, a coach.  Coach Bray has been coaching numerous sports for 32 years, such as baseball, track, volleyball and basketball. Basketball has always been at the top of Coach Bray’s list, but after the many seasons of hard work and dedication,  Coach Bray said it’s definitely time to start winding down.

“I don’t remember the last time I sat down on Christmas with my family and thought to myself ‘Oh, I’m having a great time,’ because I was always thinking about the next practice or big game.” said Coach Bray. He would spend not only his holidays watching film or answering emails, but any additional free time he had as well. Coaching was a full time job and for 32 years, it took a lot of time and effort. Bray said it’s time to start being with his family more, especially his wife whom he referred to as “an angel” after all of the support she’s given him since they began dating in high school.

A New Era for the Black Hole

Lucas Liebowitz ’19
EE
 Contributor

Trumbull’s “Black Hole”

Student support at our football games has clearly experienced a revival both in its numbers and its energy. At home football games this year, the student fan section, also known as the Black Hole, is a crowded frenzy of excited students immersed in a student-produced cloud of baby powder.

Participation at the student section, at football games especially, has improved from last year. More students are attending the school’s sporting events, wanting to be a part of the new Black Hole.

Greg Kaufmann, a senior and a regular spectator of the football games during his years at the school, believes that this year’s Black Hole is “so much more engaging and fun this year. Last year’s Black Hole didn’t have nearly as many students in it, and the students that lead it this year do a much better job at keeping people engaged.”

Girl’s Volleyball Team Are FCIAC Champs!

Manan Manchanda ‘19
EE Co-Editor-in-Chief

After an electrifying win in the semifinal against Ludlowe, Trumbull Girls Volleyball competed in the FCIAC championship on Saturday, November 3rd. The girls had an impressive performance with a sweeping 3-0 victory against the 1 seeded Westhill Vikings.

A nail-biting semifinal game preceded the championship win on Thursday, November 1st. The Eagles eventually came out on top in 5 (25-15, 23-25, 25-21, 21-25, 15-10), which energized them for their big game the following Saturday.

“We knew Ludlowe would be a tough game, especially since the neutral location happened to be their gym,” says Captain and Libero Rachel Hage (‘19). Despite the obvious disadvantage on opposing turf, the Eagles were able to hang on for a crucial win in the 5th set. “Once we won that energy and drive to win, it helped carry us into Saturday’s game, allowing us to sweep Westhill.”

The MLB’s Checkbook Champions

Greg Kaufmann ’19
EE Contributor

The Boston Red Sox have the highest payroll in Major League Baseball.

As October approaches, the MLB playoff hunt thickens, and champagne bottles pop as the league’s most deserving teams punch their tickets to the postseason. To achieve this feat, each contending team has a talent-filled roster with some of the league’s highest paid stars, thus creating massive team payrolls for contenders that are well over the league’s median. The correlation between the league’s top clubs and the highest payrolls is extremely strong, and it begs the question: Is a high payroll in the MLB worth it? And how can low-budget, small-market teams compete with the deep pockets of teams like New York, Boston and Los Angeles?

Frankly, it’s worth it to pay the big bucks, as according to Sportrac.com, nine out of the league’s fifteen teams above the $141 million median salary are teams in the playoff hunt. Undoubtedly, winning does not come without a price. The impact of high salaries on the team’s success is clear, as the league’s best team, a 103 win and 47 loss Boston Red Sox team, boasts both the league’s most impressive record and highest payroll, at $228,333,860. With this salary, the Red Sox have made a statement about the justification of paying anything to win. The Red Sox have splashed on expensive free agents in order to capitalize on a talented, young core of players before they too demand outrageous salaries. Other top performing and top payroll teams like the Los Angeles Dodgers, Houston Astros, and New York Yankees, to go along with the Sox, are not hard to find. The MLB’s group of winners is also the group with the deepest pockets.


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