Monthly Archives: December 2017


Anjeli Sambasivam ‘18
EE Senior Lifestyle Editor

The holidays are quickly approaching! While most people enjoy eating food, one of my favorite parts of this time of year is decorating the table to get everyone in the holiday spirit. This holiday season, spruce up your table with some of these DIY decorations.

Decoration #1: Pinecone Garland
– Pinecones
– Glue (mod podge)
– Glitter
– Twine/String
– Nails/Thumbtacks
– Cinnamon (optional)

1. Pour mod podge into a bowl and pour glitter of choice into a second bowl.
2. Optional: Pour cinnamon into a seperate bowl. Roll pinecones in cinnamon to get that holiday scent.
3. Roll pinecones in mod podge and then roll in glitter.
4. Set pinecones aside overnight until dry.
5. Use nails/thumbtacks to hang up your garland.
6. Optional: Hang up the garland with some fairy lights to add that holiday sparkle!

IT’s Horrifying

Jason Winegar ‘21
EE Staff Writer

“It” movie poster.

If you like horror movies then “IT” is the movie for you. Director Andrés Muschietti’s version of the Stephen King novel, “IT” is about the seven teen outcasts Bill (Jaeden Lieberher), Ben (Jeremy Ray Taylor), Bev (Sophia Lillis), Richie (Finn Wolfhard), Mike (Chosen Jacobs), Eddie (Jack Dylan Grazer), and Stanley (Wyatt Oleff). They live in the town of Derry, Maine.

One summer, they are confronted by an evil clown named Pennywise (Bill Skarsgaͦrd) that comes out of the sewers every twenty-seven years and kidnaps children. Each of them must face their greatest fear in order to find the missing children and stop Pennywise, but will they really be able to defeat this force of evil that has been terrorizing Derry’s children for years?

Model Congress Trumps the Competition

Joseph Piccolo ’18
Summer Zajac ‘18
EE Staff Writers

Members of the Model Congress club in Washington, D.C.

On Thursday, November 16th, Trumbull High School’s Model Congress team embarked on a journey to Washington, D.C. to participate in a conference hosted by Princeton University. 26 students took part on the trip, as well as the club’s advisor Ms. Katie Boland and chaperone Mr. Michael Margonis.

The team participated in debates for approximately 25 hours over the course of four days, speaking on topics from the Voting Rights Act and free speech on campuses, to authorized use of the military and solar panels for schools.

To prepare for each conference, students are required to write their own bills ahead of time, and in smaller committees of 15 to 20 people, they are debated and voted upon.

Once a bill has been passed through a committee, there is a chance that it may be introduced in a Full Session of the House or Senate, meaning that it is debated again amongst a larger group of about 70 delegates. 20 out of 26 students had their bills passed through their committees, and seniors Jessica Parillo and Laura Rosales had their bills passed through Full Sessions of the House and Senate, respectively.

And The Cows Go Boo

Archana Ajay ‘18
EE Head Lifestyle Reporter

Every year, the Trumbull Agriscience and Biotechnology Center get together and set up Farm Fair. Members of the Trumbull community came to support the Agriscience center, while enjoying all the things that the center has to offer. People toured the farm and visited the horses, alpacas, llamas, and sheep all located at the farm.

“I think what people love most about farm fair are the animals— especially the sheep and the horses!” Makayla Albert, a senior in Animal science, says.

All year, the upperclassmen in Equine and Animal science take care of the llamas, alpacas, sheep, and other animals in the farm, and at Farm Fair, several students help to take care of the animals, cleaning their pens and giving a tour of the farmhouse.

In addition to touring the farmhouse, students got the chance to showcase their own personal, entrepreneurial projects.
Students in the Agriscience center all need to complete an SAE throughout their four years in the program, which can range from volunteer work to creating their own entrepreneurial project.

Students Slay Spirit Week

Seniors Kavya Ganugapati, Neha Rahalkar, Nancie Ziegler, and Megha Shankar

Rohit Gunda ‘21
EE Staff Writer

This year’s Spirit Week, which lasted from October 16 to October 20, was a huge success! Every year, the school community comes together to show their school pride by dressing up each day according to different themes. From people with crazy amounts of face paint to fake dinosaurs running around the halls, this week was surely one to remember.

On Monday, THS participated in USA Day. Students wore red, white, and blue to show school spirit as well as pride for our country. During lunch, the whole cafeteria was a sea of red, white, and blue.

On Tuesday, THS participated in Decades Day, where students dressed in outfits from their favorite decade. Many people wore leather jackets from the 50s, neon yoga pants from the 80s, and tuxedos from the roarin’ 20s. This was a very diverse day with a huge variety in clothing.

During the middle of the week. Wednesday was color wars! Freshmen wore green, sophomores wore red, juniors wore blue, and seniors wore white.

On Thursday, the school held its Sponsor-a Senior Day!.Many seniors wore costumes such as dinosaurs, the queen’s guard, and even boxer. This was a great day to lift many spirits and to give a laugh to those who needed it.

“My favorite part about Spirit Week was being able to dress up as a green M & M for Sponsor-a-Senior. Even though I changed for my college interview later that day, it was interesting walking in with green glitter still in my hair,” senior Sarah Margolnick said.

Finally, Friday was the school Pep Rally. Students wore black and gold to represent our school.

Co-ed Isn’t the Best Ed: The Dawn of Girls in Boy Scouts

James Dubreuil ‘19
EE Staff Writer

Boy Scouts. For years and years, it has been Boy Scouts. On October 11th, the 107-year-old organization known as the Boy Scouts of America announced that girls will be allowed to join scouting packs, troops, and even work to reach the prestigious rank of Eagle Scout.

Have you ever heard of the Gold Award? How about Eagle Scout? These two awards are the highest rank in Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. Most people only recognize one, and it is probably the latter. As Harrison Gilberti (‘19), an active member of the scouting program for over 12 years, explains, “the Eagle Scout award is universally acknowledged by society, but what even is the Gold Award?” This is just one of the reasons that many girls wanted this plan of action to take place. One Eagle Scout, Arnav Srivastava (‘19), does not believe that “… allowing girls into Boy Scouts is a step in the right direction.” Rather than allowing girls into the Boy Scouts, he believes that it would be a more logical idea to fortify the Girl Scouts program and make it of equal foundation to that of the Boy Scouts.

A Right Turn For Driver’s Ed?

Arnav Srivastava ‘19
EE Senior Opinions Editor

Across the nation, finally turning the glorious 16-years-old comes with a dreaded opportunity of its own: Driver’s Education. In order for any highschooler of age to ultimately earn their driver’s license, they must first pass their state’s permit test, and then take a Driver’s Education course as well as gain on-road driving experience.

However, over time, high schoolers have began voicing their discontent with the Driver’s Education license obtaining process, and perhaps for a good reason too.

For one thing, the process of ensuring drivers’ knowledge seems a little illogical. To prove one’s proficiency if the Connecticut Driver’s Manual, one conventionally takes the CT Permit Test prior to Driver’s Ed, whereas the purpose of Driver’s Ed is to have students fully understand all information provided in the Driver’s’ Manual and teach students how to be a safe driver.

Although previously Driver’s Ed was offered before the written driver’s’ test, its current setup is a little strange, since drivers are essentially proving sufficient knowledge by earning their permit, making the class somewhat redundant for the overwhelming number of students who have earned their permit in advance.

Surviving School Stress

Mishka Kapoor ‘21
EE Staff Writer

The sound of your alarm clock pierces your ears and you open your eyes. It feels like you were sleeping for 5 minutes, and you groggily roll out of bed. After changing and getting ready for school, you realize you don’t have enough time to eat breakfast. So, you grab a granola bar and run out the door to catch the bus.

Finally, after a long 7 hours, the last bell rings. You want to celebrate, until you realize you have to go to sports practice. The thought makes you annoyed and even more exhausted. The practice is long and hard, and all you can think about is going home and sleeping. Once you get home, however, you can’t relax or because there is a big pile of homework sitting in your backpack. You groan and slowly begin the process.

All this? A normal high schooler’s routine. Sounds pretty rough, right? In fact, this is reality for most of the students in high school. There is a point when you can feel really frustrated and overwhelmed, and stress emanates from your feelings. You have absolutely no idea how to handle your situation. You’re stuck.

The Phone of the Future…in 2017

Ashley Matera ‘18
EE Contributor

Wireless charging, an all glass design, and the fastest, smartest chip ever. They all seem like things of the future but instead are happening now! These are just some of the features of the all new Apple iPhone 8 and 8 Plus. The two new additions to the iPhone family were released on September 22, 2017.

“I like the look of the iPhone 8 and I also like the new upgrades it has,” senior Ramije Egriu said.

Prices ranging from $699 to $949 may stop you from even considering to purchse this phone but the new features make it difficult to stay away. An all new design featuring Apple’s most durable glass, for instance, gives the product extra water and dust resistance.

Improved from older models, both battery life and storage capacity have been increased. The new iPhone can also have between 64 or 256 GB of memory, and the fastest and smartest chip to ever be in a smartphone.

Remembering Our Heroes: World War I

Mike Magut ‘20
EE Staff Writer

Nothing holds more power than our history. Events that occurred in the past have effectively created everything that we have and understand today. All periods of history should be remembered, as they gave us this very world that we have come to know.

Now, as we approach the 100th anniversary of the Great War armistice, it is time to look back at one of the most important events in known history: World War I.

Starting November 17, Central Connecticut State University will host a World War I exhibit in the Burritt Library to commemorate the period of U.S. involvement.

The exhibit contains displays of rare, authentic uniforms and equipment of servicemen and sailors.
A special focus of the display will feature Connecticut veterans and their wartime experience.

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